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Africa has clear and compelling drivers that are propelling its mobile market forward.

The UN forecasts population growth across the continent of Africa will triple this century, to 4.3 billion.

Africa is also one of the world’s most rapidly urbanising populations. UN forecasts to 2035 highlight that all of the world’s top ten fastest growing cities are in Africa. Four of them are in our markets of DRC (Kinshasa, Lubumbashi and Mbuji-Mayi) and Tanzania (Dar es Salaam).

This population growth is mirrored by rising GDP. Africa accounts for five of the World Bank’s top ten fastest-growing economies in 2019 (and this includes our market of Ghana).

Together, these dynamics create a compelling macro environment for growth in mobile usage and, by extension, investment in mobile infrastructure.


+55 million

Additional Mobile Subscribers (2018-2024E)

+19,000

Additional Points of Service (2018-2024E)


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MULTIPLE METRICS SUPPORT THE CASE FOR INVESTMENT IN AFRICAN MOBILE INFRASTRUCTURE:

  • A fast-growing population. Africa’s total population is forecast to triple in the next 80 years, significantly faster than any other continent in the world.
  • A young, tech savvy population. Africa has the largest proportion of population under 30 years of age. This demographic embraces technology and consumes vast amounts of mobile data through social media and app platforms. This drives MNOs to invest in both improving and expanding their networks in our markets.
  • An urbanising population. UN forecasts show that the world’s top 10 fastest-growing cities are all in Africa. Denser and more populous cities create demand for increased mobile network capacity and associated investment by MNOs, both in new technologies (3G, 4G, 5G) and associated points of service, and network density (more sites).
  • Scarce fixed line availability. African territories rely on mobile for nearly all their communications needs. Fixed line availability across the continent remains poor or indeed non-existent, with the vast African territories more practically and effectively served through mobile.